HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT

Goals + Outcomes for statewide program funding

>> Download the awards granted for this portfolio’s 2017 funding opportunity, arranged by goal

 

Goal 1: Achieve the mutual goals of community well-being, economic vitality and environmental stewardship

Intended outcomes

  • Innovation + Scaling: Identification and expanded use of effective models and strategies that provide measurable social, economic and environmental benefits
  • Policy + Systems: Adoption and implementation of public policies, public investments and institutional practices that provide measurable social, economic and environmental benefits
  • Organizational Capacity: Strengthened long-term health and capacity of key organizations, collaboratives and networks
     

Examples of what we might fund

We recognize that many organizations identify with this goal and hold sustainability as an organizational value. Please note, however, that projects funded in support of this goal must demonstrate measurable environmental, economic (e.g. jobs, wealth, income) and social impacts. If you will not be able to measure impact in all three of these areas, do not select this goal. Instead, please assess whether your proposed project might be a stronger fit with one of the other goals.

Projects funded under this goal could address a wide range of issues, including (but not limited to) building Oregon's sustainable food systems, addressing climate justice and clean/renewable energy, improving community livability and the built environment, addressing public health concerns related to the environment, or building the restoration economy. We aim to help spark or accelerate efforts aligning with this goal at different scales: a single site, one or more neighborhoods or communities, a city, a region, or statewide.

In general, fundraising capacity building grants are a low priority in this goal. For other capacity building projects, strong applicants will be those whose core programmatic work advances one of the other outcomes in this goal (policy + systems or innovation + scaling).

Three examples of what we funded under this goal in 2017 include:

  • A collaborative effort to pilot and scale efforts to establish community forests in coastal drinking watersheds to enhance stewardship and create community benefits.
  • Efforts to build a base of diverse stakeholders for a statewide energy system reform effort designed to increase energy efficiency, reduce carbon emissions and provide consumers with reliable and affordable clean energy.
  • Demonstration projects that remove barriers to access and increase adoption of electric vehicles and e-bikes in low-income communities and communities of color.

These are only examples to illustrate the types of projects funded under this goal. To see more examples, visit our grants database. We invite other ideas that would further our goals and intended outcomes.

Goal 2: Ensure that environmental impacts + benefits are equitably distributed among communities

Intended outcomes

  • Community Influence: Increased emphasis on the priorities of communities experiencing disparities to shift and broaden perspectives and reform existing systems and institutions
  • Increased Opportunities: Increased opportunities for communities experiencing disparities to benefit from nature and investments in environmental protection
  • Reduced Burdens: Reduced environmental health burdens on communities experiencing disparities
  • Organizational Capacity: Strengthened long-term health and capacity of key organizations, collaboratives and networks

Examples of what we might fund

Examples of the types of environmental disparities we aim to address include (but are not limited to) the exposure of Oregon's farm and forestry workers to pesticides and poor living conditions, disproportionate health burdens impacting Oregon's Native communities as a result of high levels of toxics exposure and inadequate protection of traditional food sources, the disparate impacts of air pollution and industrial pollutants on many of Oregon's most racially diverse communities, and poor access to parks and nature by many low-income communities and communities of color.

Three examples of projects funded under this goal in 2017 include:

  • A new climate justice organizer position to support advocacy for equitable climate action in the city of Portland.
  • Operating support for an organization working to build a climate movement in southern Oregon led by those most impacted.
  • A grant for stewardship and restoration efforts in the Johnson Creek watershed aimed at deepening partnership with and engagement of people of color and immigrants.

These are only examples to illustrate the types of projects we might fund. We invite other ideas that would further our goals and intended outcomes.

Goal 3: Support a movement for a healthy environment that is effective + relevant for all of Oregon's diverse communities

Intended outcomes

  • Equity Focus: Increased commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion among organizations working for a healthy environment and improved understanding of how to advance equity through their work
  • Collaboration: Increased collaboration and sector alignment that engages diverse constituencies toward shared environmental priorities
  • Narrative Change: Increased emphasis on the concerns and interests of diverse communities in the public discourse related to a healthy environment

Examples of What We Might Fund

We recognize that building an inclusive environmental movement in Oregon means that the current movement needs to change. To do this, organizations must learn to think differently about their work, including learning about other communities and cultures to make sure that their approach and how they operate respects and includes them. It means building new relationships. It also means developing new stories and narratives to describe the change we are trying to create so that the words we use to explain our vision for the future does not reinforce the status quo and existing power structure that favors certain communities and identities over others.

Examples of projects that we fund to advance this goal include (but are not limited to) support for organizational diversity, equity and inclusion training, planning and implementation; collaborations between organizations that serve or are led by communities experiencing disparities, environmental organizations and other nontraditional partners; and support for key intermediaries and coalition builders to advance coordination, effectiveness and impact of the field as a whole. In addition, funded projects may include communications research, message framing and creative engagement to change and expand the narrative of Oregon's environmental movement.

Three examples of projects funded under this goal in 2017 include:

  • To support equity, diversity and inclusion work, including building an inclusive culture and developing equitable internal systems.
  • To deepen the organization's equity work, including support to develop a land conservation deal in collaboration with the Clatsop-Nehalem Confederated Tribes
  • To work with three environmental justice organizations in identifying visual images that portray just, sustainable communities that resonate with communities of color and low-income communities

These are only examples to illustrate the types of projects we might fund. We invite other ideas that would further our goals and intended outcomes.

Goal 4: Ensure that natural systems are healthy and able to adapt to changing conditions + long-term impacts

Intended outcomes

  • Ecological Health: Expanded use of new, promising and proven strategies for protecting or restoring ecosystems and critical natural resources to ensure their long-term health
  • Policy and Systems: Adoption and implementation of public policies, public investments and institutional practices that support healthy ecosystems and natural resources
  • Organizational Capacity: Strengthened long-term health and capacity of key organizations, collaboratives and networks
     

Examples of what we might fund

Projects may focus on protecting and restoring the full range of Oregon's ecosystems, including forested mountains, deserts, agricultural valleys, rivers and wetlands, shrub- and grass-covered plains, beaches, and nearshore marine ecosystems.

We will prioritize landscape-scale and statewide efforts, including public policy work aimed at establishing new funding and new protection and restoration strategies, as well as efforts that aim to implement existing plans and policies based on sound ecosystem management principles. We expect that funded organizations will demonstrate a commitment to equity, operationalize it in their work and demonstrate progress over time.

In general, fundraising capacity building grants are a low priority in this goal. For other capacity building projects, strong applicants will be those whose programmatic work is landscape-scale and/or statewide.

Three examples of projects funded under this goal in 2017 include:

  • A grant to strengthen partnerships with tribes, including integrating conservation practices that reflect traditional knowledge with science-based practices to conserve and restore ecosystem health in eastern Oregon's high desert.
  • A collaboration that recruits and engages rural and urban youths, including a focus on Latinos, and connects them to restoration work in Mt. Hood National Forest.
  • A water resource management plan for the mid-coast region that integrates the priorities of diverse communities and balances ecosystem health, economic and social justice needs.

These are only examples to illustrate the types of projects we might fund. We invite other ideas that would further our goals and intended outcomes.