ICYMI: Meyer Memorial Trust Breaks Ground on North Portland Campusdarion Mon, 08/19/2019 - 16:06

On July 29, Meyer Memorial Trust staff, trustees and community partners celebrated the start of construction for the foundation's future home at 2045 North Vancouver Avenue.

The Portland Observer covered the groundbreaking ceremony about the 20,000-foot structure, just northeast of the Broadway Bridge, that will house office space for about 50 staff and feature a library, educational garden and convening space for all-hands meeting and collaborating with community partners:

“Establishing a permanent home in historic Albina is one way to show Meyer’s commitment to building partnerships and connections that help to make Oregon a flourishing and equitable state,” said Meyer president & CEO Michelle J. DePass."

Read the full story about Meyer’s new campus in historic Albina here.

From left to right, Meyer president and CEO Michelle J. DePass, trustee Janet Hamada, board chair Toya Fick, trustee Alice Cuprill-Comas and trustee Mitch Hornecker (not shown trustee Charles Wilhoite). (Photo by Fred Joe)

From left to right, Meyer president and CEO Michelle J. DePass, trustee Janet Hamada, board chair Toya Fick, trustee Alice Cuprill-Comas and trustee Mitch Hornecker (not shown trustee Charles Wilhoite). | Photo by Fred Joe

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ICYMI: Trail Blazers Honor Trail Blazers

In celebration of Black History Month, the Portland Trail Blazers honored six leaders in Oregon — including Linfield College president Dr. Miles Davis, Portland City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty, Oregon Health & Science University president Dr. Danny Jacobs, Oregon Supreme Court Justice Adrienne Nelson, Portland Police Bureau chief Danielle Outlaw and Meyer Memorial Trust president & CEO Michelle J. DePass — to recognize their groundbreaking leadership, each as the first African American to hold their executive-level position within their respective institutions.

Read the Skanner News’ reporting on the event that took place during the Feb. 5 🏀 basketball game between the #RipCity Trail Blazers and Miami Heat here.

A photo of Trail Blazer honorees, from left to right: Linfield College president Dr. Miles Davis, Meyer's president & CEO Michelle J. DePass, Portland City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty, Portland Police Bureau chief Danielle Outlaw, Oregon Supreme Court Justice Adrienne Nelson and Oregon Health & Science University president Dr. Danny Jacobs.

Honorees Linfield College president Dr. Miles Davis, Meyer CEO Michelle J. DePass, Portland City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty, Portland Police Bureau chief Danielle Outlaw, Oregon Supreme Court Justice Adrienne Nelson and OHSU president Dr. Danny Jacobs.

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ICYMI: “Disrupting the Legacy of Colonialism.” An Oregon Funder Partners With Tribes on the Environmentdarion Mon, 03/11/2019 - 11:40

A partnership between Tribes of the Pacific Northwest and Meyer seeks to integrate and honor Native wisdom within the environmental movement.

Inside Philanthropy examines a recent batch of grants awarded through Meyer's Healthy Environment portfolio and the unique role its grantmaking plays in supporting Tribal communities:

"[We] are excited to learn more about how traditional ecological knowledge of indigenous communities and Western science can work together to support healthy natural systems and communities," portfolio director Jill Fuglister wrote in a blog at the end of 2018. She tells IP this integration "opens the door to addressing the disparate impacts of environmental problems that indigenous communities experience by creating space for indigenous leaders to bring their concerns, priorities and solutions to environmental protection efforts."

By turning to local Native American communities to help steer its environmental grantmaking practices, Meyer may create a rich example of how environmental and social movements can come together. We see more, but arguably not enough, environmental, social justice and human rights-focused groups acknowledging and exploring how their causes overlap. At the crux of this intersection is the fact that minority groups are often the most affected by environmental degradation and calamity, and the recognition that these same communities can be a source of experience-based, authentic responses to these problems.

Read the full article here.

Photo caption: A mist covers the canopy of a forest in front of Mount Hood in Oregon, atop an amber horizon during sunrise.

Photo caption: A mist covers the canopy of a forest in front of Mount Hood in Oregon, atop an amber horizon during sunrise.

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ICYMI: Chinook Nation buys an Oregon footholddarion Mon, 02/11/2019 - 11:00

The Chinook Indian Nation recently bought about 10 acres of heavily forested land in Warrenton around Tansy Creek, one of many locations where Chinookan tribes — Clatsop, Cathlamet, Lower Chinook Wahkiakum and Willapa — were pushed off by European settlers. The plan: to purchase, protect and revitalize the Tribes’ historically important 1851 Tansy Point treaty grounds.

The Daily Astorian documents the purchase, made possible by grants from organizations such as the Oregon Community Foundation, Meyer Memorial Trust, Collins Foundation and others:

“'The Clatsop folks covered this whole south shore of the Columbia, really, from around Astoria itself heading west, and then of course down the adjacent seashore all the way down to Tillamook Head, that country,” (Tony Johnson, chairman of the Chinook Indian Nation) said. “But all the main country people think about here in terms of Hammond, Gearhart, Seaside — that’s all Clatsop territory.'

The property near Tansy Point is near where, in the summer of 1851, members of all five Chinookan tribes gathered to negotiate with Anson Dart, the first superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Oregon Territory, to avoid relocation east of the Cascade Mountains. It is the only known instance when all tribal ancestors were gathered in one place, Johnson said."

Read the entire piece here.

A tract of land near the Warrenton Waterfront Trail was recently purchased by the Chinook Indian Nation.

A tract of land near the Warrenton Waterfront Trail was recently purchased by the Chinook Indian Nation.

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ICYMI: How Can Philanthropy Advance Martin Luther King's Goals? 13 Leaders Weigh In

In honor of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s 90th birthday, 13 leaders in philanthropy share thoughts on how they and their organizations are advancing King's vision of racial and economic justice.

The Chronicle of Philanthropy documents their reflections:

"Yesterday's injustice remains today's inequality," wrote Meyer President & CEO Michelle J. Depass. "The racial wealth and income gap endures, wider, even, than it was in 1968, when King was killed. Built, as it is, on the great fortunes of America, U.S. philanthropy holds a key role in closing that racial wealth and income gap.

Since refocusing its work to address inequities in Oregon, Meyer Memorial Trust has been working to dismantle structural and systemic inequities at the root of disparities in education, housing, the environment and communities, both rural and urban."

Read the entire piece here.

Martin Luther King Junior Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Martin Luther King Junior Memorial in Washington, D.C.

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ICYMI: Opinion – Looking to Finland to improve Oregon’s schools

In early November, four public education leaders from Oregon — including Meyer's Equitable Education portfolio director Matt Morton, The Chalkboard Project executive director Whitney Grubbs, KairosPDX executive director Kali Thorne Ladd and Future School Lab founder Vanessa Wilkins — journeyed to Finland in search of solutions to improve schools and outcomes for students within the state.

While abroad, they participated in both Helsinki Education Week and the HundrED Innovation Summit. A new op-ed in The Oregonian highlights learnings from their journey:

Through this experience, we served as teachers as well as students. As a largely homogenous country, Finland admits challenges in meeting the needs of its rapidly growing immigrant population. We proudly shared stories about Oregon’s rich diversity, our focus on data to identify and understand disparities and the deep collaborations between public, private and civic sectors. We highlighted “bright spots,” such as KairosPDX’s model for culturally responsive teaching for African American children, Chalkboard Project’s work to support and elevate teachers, and the Meyer Memorial Trust’s transformation to more equitable and strategic grant-making.

You can read the entire piece here.

Oregon education leaders journey to Finland in search of solutions to improve schools and student success

A collage of photos taken at Kulosaari Secondary School and Rajakylän koulu (Vantaa) in Finland.

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Kaberi Banerjee Murthy joins Meyer as new Director of Program Strategy

I'm excited to announce today that Meyer Memorial Trust has named Kaberi Banerjee Murthy to be our new Director of Program Strategy.

Kaberi, who most recently served as vice president of programs at the Brooklyn Community Foundation in New York, brings to Meyer more than 20 years of philanthropic experience in youth, immigration, social justice, education, arts, civic affairs, health and community development at local, regional and national levels.

Kaberi has extensive experience building strategic frameworks and elevating advocacy as the highest value use of philanthropic resources and reputation. She has shared power with community to build constituent led grantmaking and is committed to implementing best practices of the sector to reduce the burden on grantees. As Meyer's new Director of Program Strategy, she will be responsible for fostering organization-wide collaboration while developing and implementing programmatic strategies that reinforce Meyer’s four portfolios and help leverage underlying intersections among them.

"We are thrilled to announce Kaberi Banerjee Murthy as Meyer’s new Director of Program Strategy as we begin to sharpen our strategies and focused objectives,” said Michelle J. DePass, president and CEO of Meyer Memorial Trust. “As a proven change agent, Kaberi will help Meyer to better address the intersection of societal causes of inequity while harnessing expertise cultivated in communities across Oregon.”

At Brooklyn Community Foundation, a racial justice foundation with $75 million in assets, Kaberi led the strategy, vision and implementation of grantmaking, programs and advocacy. Under her leadership, she grew the portfolio to oversee eight giving areas and doubled its annual grantmaking.

Previously, she served as program director at Crown Family Philanthropies in Chicago, senior program officer for education at the Picower Foundation in New York, philanthropic advisor at Hemenway and Barnes in Boston and program officer at the Lloyd A. Fry Foundation in Chicago. She has also worked as a philanthropic consultant for the Ford Foundation’s GrantCraft and the Council on Foundations. 

Kaberi earned a Bachelor of Arts, Magna Cum Laude, from Carleton College in Northfield, Minn., and she holds a Masters of Education​, Administration in Planning and Social Policy from Harvard University.

“As someone who has been passionate about addressing issues of equity, effecting social change and centering the expertise of impacted communities, I’ve been impressed by Meyer’s embodied leadership, the humility of the staff and the organizational shift to focus on systems-level change. My background and skill set dovetail perfectly with Meyer’s mission to create a sustainable future for Oregon,” Kaberi said.

She begins work at Meyer on Nov. 29.

— Kimberly

Kaberi Banerjee Murthy name Director of Program Strategy
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ICYMI: A Focus on Equity is Changing One Northwest Funder’s Environmental Giving

Meyer’s Healthy Environment portfolio endeavours to center equity as a catalyst in philanthropy to address environmental disparities in Oregon and support work that directly benefits under-resourced and historically marginalized populations in rural and urban communities.

Recently, Inside Philanthropy examined the portfolio's approach to grantmaking and the environment in coverage of Meyer's 2017 Portfolio Grant Awards:

The foundation recently announced its second round of grants since launching a new Healthy Environment portfolio, which places emphasis on “underresourced and historically marginalized populations in rural and urban communities” in its funding for the state’s environment. 

Before the new program was unveiled, the foundation was giving a lot to rivers and watersheds, and that’s still a priority. A lot of key Northwest green groups are still on the docket. But Meyer points out that in the 2017 round of green grants—totaling $3.9 million—every grantee has a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion, with a half-dozen asking the foundation for training and support in developing them.

Read Inside Philanthropy’s full exploration of Meyer’s Healthy Environment portfolio’s approach to grantmaking and the environment here.

RURAL OREGON. PHOTO:  DAN LEWIS/SHUTTERSTOCK

Rural Oregon, by Dan Lewis. Image source: Inside Philanthropy

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ICYMI: Mitch Hornecker honored at 2018 Business Leadership Evening

The intersection of business, community and philanthropy was the central theme at the Portland Business Alliance's annual Business Leadership Evening, which honored Mitch Hornecker with the 2018 William S. Naito Outstanding Service Award to recognize his impact in our community.  

Traditionally, the PBA makes a donation to an organization of the honoree's choosing. This year, Mitch selected New Avenues for Youth, a nonprofit he founded to raise up at-risk local youth and get them off of the street:

“Also featured last night was keynote speaker Michelle DePass, president and CEO of Meyer Memorial Trust. Both Hornecker and DePass emphasized the importance of philanthropic support to addressing critical issues, like homelessness. 

'We need a bold, new plan,' said Hornecker. 'We need to scale up. This is the defining crisis of our time.'

'Philanthropy spends so much time fixing problems our system of wealth has created in the first place,"'said DePass. 'Today, we can and we should be about identifying all of the systemic sources contributing to our problem and shock the system to prevent them from happening again and again.'" 

You can find more about the event here.

— Kimberly

"We need a bold, new plan," Hornecker told the audience at the Portland Business Alliance's annual Business Leadership Evening. "We need to scale up. This is the defining crisis of our time."

"We need a bold, new plan," Hornecker told the audience at the Portland Business Alliance's annual Business Leadership Evening. "We need to scale up. This is the defining crisis of our time." Photo: Chad Baker Photography

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ICYMI: Charles Wilhoite on Meyer Memorial Trust and transparent leadership

Culture change. That was the topic of a recent feature in the Oregon Business magazine, where reporter Allan Brettman interviewed eight business and civic leaders, including Meyer board chair, Charles Wilhoite.

Charles spoke about how Meyer's CEO search process reflected our culture:

“Meyer is about the most transparent organization I’ve ever been affiliated with because employees participate in just about everything,” says Wilhoite, the board chairman who was head of the search committee to find a replacement for Doug Stamm, who announced last April he would be departing this year after serving 15 years as chief executive.

Wilhoite and the board decided the CEO search would mimic the trust’s participatory culture. That meant telling employees they would have a direct role in selecting the new chief.

“We put it out there that we’re going to go through a search process. We want your feedback regarding attributes and characteristics and traits you want to see in the next CEO, and not all companies do that.”

You can find more from Charles here.

“Meyer is about the most transparent organization I’ve ever been affiliated with because employees participate in just about everything,” says Charles Wilhoite, the board chairman who was head of the search committee to find a replacement for Doug Stamm.

“Meyer is about the most transparent organization I’ve ever been affiliated with because employees participate in just about everything,” says Charles Wilhoite, the board chairman who was head of the search committee to find a replacement for Doug Stamm.

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